We are delighted to welcome Greyhound Rescue for the first time to Cruelty Free Festival 2014! Greyhound Rescue is a charity based organisation that was set up in 2005 by Peter and Janet Flann to find homes for the many greyhounds surplus to the requirements of the Racing Industry. In that time they have found homes for more than 500 greyhounds which otherwise would not have had a life after finishing their racing career or failing to start one. Greyhound Rescue has full charity status, it does not receive any official funding and relies solely on donations, which are tax deductible, and fundraising to pay for the initial costs involved to desex, vaccinate, microchip, heartworm test the greyhounds and the long term costs to keep them in food and shelter until they find a home. Their aim is to educate the public about the thousands of greyhounds that are considered ‘waste’ by this industry and to demonstrate what gentle affectionate and social dogs they are - they make fantastic pets! Greyhound Rescue will be bringing 2 gorgeous greyhounds with them on the day! :) 

We are delighted to welcome Greyhound Rescue for the first time to Cruelty Free Festival 2014! Greyhound Rescue is a charity based organisation that was set up in 2005 by Peter and Janet Flann to find homes for the many greyhounds surplus to the requirements of the Racing Industry. In that time they have found homes for more than 500 greyhounds which otherwise would not have had a life after finishing their racing career or failing to start one. 
Greyhound Rescue has full charity status, it does not receive any official funding and relies solely on donations, which are tax deductible, and fundraising to pay for the initial costs involved to desex, vaccinate, microchip, heartworm test the greyhounds and the long term costs to keep them in food and shelter until they find a home. 
Their aim is to educate the public about the thousands of greyhounds that are considered ‘waste’ by this industry and to demonstrate what gentle affectionate and social dogs they are - they make fantastic pets! 
Greyhound Rescue will be bringing 2 gorgeous greyhounds with them on the day! :) 

hazelhound:

She is not allowed on the couch now. So she is on the footstool. It is a tragedy. She almost fell off as I was typing.

A list of Finnish words that tell you something about Finnish culture

depressingfinland:

acebutt:

- Kekkuloida = to prance or just hang around naked (yes, the word includes the presumption that you are naked)

- Örveltää = to be really drunk and do whatever you do when you’re really drunk, like crawling in a ditch somewhere on all fours

- Perskärpänen…

(Source: katniseverdeenn)

awwww-cute:

Five Baby Capybaras Born at Zoo Berlin

awwww-cute:

Five Baby Capybaras Born at Zoo Berlin

earthlynation:

Caracal Kittens (set of 3) (Explored) (by Steph C Kay)

earthlynation:

Caracal Kittens (set of 3) (Explored) (by Steph C Kay)

lindahall:

Martha - Scientific Casualty of the Day

Martha, a pigeon, died on Sep. 1, 1914. Named after Martha Washington, Martha the pigeon had lived at the Cincinnati Zoo for 29 years. She was the last of her species, and when she joined the choir invisible, the world suffered perhaps its most famous extinction. For Martha was a passenger pigeon. Once her kind had darkened the American skies and numbered in the billions. Now, unthinkably, the billions had been reduced to one, and then to zero. Upon her demise, Martha was frozen in ice and shipped to the Smithsonian, where she was stuffed and put on display, as a reminder of the peril of unchecked plundering of our natural resources. You can access Martha’s acquisition record online. After a half-century of display, Martha was removed to some shelf in the bowels of the Washington mall, but as the centennial of her death approached, the National Museum of Natural History refurbished Martha and placed her once again on view. In fact, the museum created a new exhibition around her: Once There were Billions, which opened this past June. And if you noticed all the photos of Martha on the acquisition record, many were taken so the Smithsonian could give us this—a rotating three-dimensional view of Martha.

The Cincinnati Zoo has not forgotten its most famous long-term resident. They built a pagoda-shaped memorial aviary in the 1970s, and there is a bronze statue of Martha on permanent display out front (see second and third images above). The memorial aviary also commemorates the passing of the last surviving Carolina Parakeet, a male named Incas, which, amazingly, died in the very same cage that had held Martha, on Feb. 21, 1918.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

hadissima:

Toller girl Ayasha showing off her jumping skills - so much energy in such a cute dog :)